Joint Effort to Improve James Miner Trail

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Representatives of Caledonia Township, the City of Corunna, and the City of Owosso gather at the James Miner trailhead to receive a contribution from Tom Cook, Executive Director of the Cook Family Foundation.

The Cook Family Foundation believes that we can accomplish more in our community when we work together.  In support of this value of collaboration, the Foundation recently made a $5,000 grant to help make improvements to the James Miner Trail along five miles of the Shiawassee River.  In the last year, four jurisdictions–Caledonia Township, the City of Corunna, the City of Owosso, and the Shiawassee Airport Board–established a Joint Trail Authority to legally share responsibility for the maintenance and improvement of this environmental and recreational resource. 

“The James Miner Trail serves the entire Shiawassee County area, and we are proud to be part of a community-wide, multi-jurisdictional effort to keep up the trail,” said Thomas Cook, Executive Director of the Cook Family Foundation.

The James Miner Trail was developed in the 1970’s through the efforts of local attorney James Miner with the participation of many organizations.  The trail has been maintained for decades by volunteer efforts.  In addition, personal contributions for trail improvements  have been made for several years as part of the annual Labor Day Bridge Walk first organized by Donna and Chuck Kerridge of Corunna.

Local governments have helped keep up the trail, but they recently decided to create a more formal structure for joint management of the trail.  Through a new Joint Powers Committee, a legal entity allowed by State law, the four jurisdictions are now contributing funds, staff time and other resources to the trail.  The Foundation’s grant matches the investments made by several units of government.

The Cook Family Foundation is committed to supporting collaborative efforts that bring together local governments, nonprofit organizations, school districts, service clubs and community groups.  Read more about our thoughts on Collective Impact (click here).

 

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